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Martin Buber: For Our Time

Sunday, December 6, 2020 20 Kislev 5781

3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Past Sessions
Sunday, November 29, 2020 13 Kislev 5781 - 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Sunday, November 22, 2020 6 Kislev 5781 - 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Sunday, November 15, 2020 28 Cheshvan 5781 - 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Meeting link is in the directory sent to Temple members and friends. Please check your most recent "What's Happening" or "Up Next" email.

Please note: Class sessions will be recorded.

Download Class Readings:

Judaism and the Jews Intro (November 15)

"Judaism and the Jews" (November 15)

Renewal of Judaism Intro (November 22)

"Renewal of Judaism" (November 22)

No More Delcarations Intro (November 29)

"No More Declarations" (November 29)

Zionism and 'Zionism' Intro (November 29)

"Zionism and 'Zionism'" (November 29)

Israel and the Command of the Spirit Intro (December 6)

"Israel and the Command of the Spirit" (December 6)

Buber's Legacy Intro (December 6)

"Buber's Legacy" (December 6)

 

Class Recordings:

Click Here to watch recordings of prior classes (Members only - login required)

 

Martin Buber

Martin Buber (1878-1965) was a Jewish philosopher, religious thinker, lecturer, journalist, publisher and editor, story teller, teacher, biblical translator, Zionist, political activist, but most of all a passionate and fearless spirit, embracing controversial and challenging points of view, and always going to the very essence of things.

He lived through the carnage of the First World War, through the Weimar Republic and the rise of Hitler, through the Second World War and the Holocaust, and through the establishment of the state of Israel.

He is best known for his philosophical work “I and Thou”, a dense and hard to digest work, exploring the relationship between man (I) and the Divine (Thou).

However, reading through the more accessible works that he produced, from the series of lectures “On Judaism”, or “A Land of two peoples”, we are struck by the relevance of his questions and arguments to our times, as well as by the indomitable passion shining through his words. They are like arrows, piercing you directly in the center of your heart, demanding, disturbing, opening half imagined horizons, bringing unsaid words to the surface.

What does it mean to be a Jew was as controversial in 1910 as it is today, one hundred and ten years later. The search for coexistence between Jews and Arabs, with dignity and mutual respect, is even more relevant today than it was in 1948. And there is more – the questions echo into larger spheres. How can Jews and Arabs coexist – how can blacks and whites coexist – how can democrats and republicans coexist – how can truth and lies coexist.

Looking forward to an exchange of views and a blossoming of hearts.

Martin Buber—For Our Time

Lively conversation on 4 consecutive Sundays at 3pm via Zoom. November 15th, 22nd, 29th, and December 6th. Buber’s essays to be discussed will be provided in advance.

Join with Rabbi Rim and TST member Marina Shalmon for passionate hour-long discussions on the (oh so!) relevant writings of Martin Buber. Though best known for his philosophical work “I and Thou”, we will read his more accessible works in a series of four Sunday afternoon conversations. Marina writes, “We are struck by the relevance of his questions  and arguments to our times, as well as by the indomitable passion shining through his words. They are like arrows, piercing you directly in the center of your heart, demanding, disturbing, opening half imagined horizons, bringing unsaid words to the surface.”

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Fri, December 4 2020 18 Kislev 5781